• DESIGN \\' CARE

Composting is Easy

#compost #zerowaste #livewcare


REDUCE YOUR WASTE BY 30%

Have you been wanting to start your own compost, but don’t know where to begin? Composting is the simplest way to reduce your organic waste and live more sustainably. As a whole, we waste about 34 million tons of food waste every year, but only 3% of that is repurposed for animal feed or composting. By turning waste into compost, we can cut down that big number and and give back nutrients into the soil. We've simplified how you can start your own compost, making it an easy and fun way to reduce your waste by 30%!

WHAT DO I NEED?

  • Tools: shovels and pitchforks

  • Brown material: broken twigs, dead leaves, and dry tree branches

  • Green materials: grass clippings, fruit/veggie scraps, and shredded newspaper

And last but not least, water to maintain the right amount of moisture to turn your compost into nutrient rich soil to keep your garden healthy and your plants happy.

WHAT CAN I COMPOST?

  • Fruits & Veggies

  • Egg Shells

  • Coffee Grounds & Filters

  • Shredded Newspapers

  • Yard/Garden Trimmings

  • Dryer & Vacuum Cleaner Lint

  • Hair and/or pet fur

  • Teabags

  • Paper

  • Sawdust

  • Cardboard

WHAT SHOULD I NOT COMPOST?

  • Dairy products (e.g., butter, milk, sour cream, yogurt) and eggs*

  • Creates odor problems and attract pests such as rodents and flies

  • Diseased or insect-ridden plants

  • Diseases or insects might survive and be transferred back to other plants

  • Fats, grease, lard, or oils*

  • Creates odor problems and attract pests such as rodents and flies

  • Meat or fish bones and scraps*

  • This can cause odor problems and attract pests such as rodents and flies

  • Pet wastes (e.g., dog or cat feces, soiled cat litter)*

  • Might contain parasites, bacteria, germs, pathogens, and viruses harmful to humans

  • Black walnut tree leaves or twigs

  • Releases substances that might be harmful to plants

  • Coal or charcoal ash

  • Might contain substances harmful to plants

  • Yard trimmings treated with chemical pesticides

  • Might kill organisms that are beneficial to composting




* Check with your local composting or recycling coordinator to see if these organics are accepted by your community curbside or drop-off composting program.

NOW LET'S GET STARTED!

There are a few different ways to start your own compost, so we’ve broken it down for you here:

indoor composting:

  • If you don't have room for an outdoor compost pile, you can compost materials indoors using a special type of bin, which you can buy at a local hardware store, gardening supplies store, or make yourself.

  • Remember to maintain your pile and keep track of what you put in it. A properly managed compost bin will not attract pests or rodents and will not smell bad.

  • Keep track of the moisture levels and run occasional tests to measure the acidity of the compost material.

  • Once the compost bin is full, move it outside, especially during warmer weather to help speed up the process.

  • Your compost should be ready in two to five weeks.

backyard composting:

  • Select a dry, shady spot near a source of water for your compost pile.

  • Add brown and green materials as they are collected, making sure larger pieces are chopped or shredded.

  • Moisten dry materials as they are added.

  • Once your compost pile is established, mix grass clippings and green waste into the pile and cover the fruit and vegetable waste with 10 inches of compost material.

  • Optional: Cover top of compost with a tarp to keep it moist. When the material at the bottom is dark and rich in color, your compost is ready to use. This usually takes anywhere between two months to two years.

NOW YOU ARE READY TO MAKE YOUR OWN!

Happy Composting


Source: www.designwcare.com

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